Harry Reid totally consistent on Senate Rules

When Harry Reid gets frustrated, he threatens to change the Senate’s rules to get his way.

The Senate Majority Leader, a Democrat from Nevada, has once again threatened to change the way the Senate works—this time, to push through President Obama’s nominees for several controversial appointments.

Reid wants to change the rules so that it would take only 51 votes, a simple majority, to break a filibuster. Now, it takes 60 votes to end debate.

The filibuster is a valued tool of minority Senators to keep the majority from simply enacting everything it wants. It’s one of the major differences between the House and Senate, making the Senate the more deliberative chamber.

But don’t take our word for it—Reid and President Obama already made the case for keeping the filibuster and the 60-vote rule intact. They argued quite well for it when they were in the Senate minority.

Obama said in 2005:
what [the American people] don’t expect, is for one party, be it Republican or Democrat, to change the rules in the middle of the game so that they can make all the decisions while the other party is told to sit down and keep quiet…everyone in this chamber knows that if the majority chooses to end the filibuster—if they choose to change the rules and put an end to democratic debate—then the fighting and the bitterness and the gridlock will only get worse.
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About Albert N. Milliron 6992 Articles
Albert Milliron is the founder of Politisite. Milliron has been credentialed by most major news networks for Presidential debates and major Political Parties for political event coverage. Albert maintains relationships with the White House and State Department to provide direct reporting from the Administration’s Press team. Albert is the former Public Relations Chairman of the Columbia County Republican Party in Georgia. He is a former Delegate. Milliron is a veteran of the US Army Medical Department and worked for Department of Veterans Affairs, Department of Psychiatry.

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